Past events

Wednesday Lunch: Kristoffer Herland Hellton

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Kristoffer Herland Hellton, Senior Research Scientist at the Norwegian Computing Center

Title: Significance for a modern world

Abstract: At this year’s Joint Statistical Meeting, Emmanuel Candes (Stanford) introduced an entirely new framework for assessing significance, regardless of method, while provably controlling the false discovery rate. The key idea is to make up fake variables, so-called “knockoffs”, which are created from the knowledge of the predictors alone, requiring no new data or knowledge of the response variable. For nearly a century, science has operated by empirically testing theories, but now Candes states: ''we have entered a new world where large data sets are available prior to the formulation of scientific theories. Researchers mine these data relentlessly and we have run into the problem of irreproducibility. The field of Statistics needs to re-invent itself to adapt to the new reality...''. This talk will present the highlights of Candes' Wald lectures and the new framework of knockoffs.

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Spiseriet, Norwegian Computing Center

Sven Furberg Seminar in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Thursday, November 30, 2017 - 14:30

Speaker: Dr. Alex Lewin, Reader in Statistics, based at the Institute of Environment, Health and Societies of the Brunel University London

Title: Bayesian inference on high-dimensional Seemingly Unrelated Regressions, applied to metabolomics data

More information and abstract

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO, Big Insight and the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Location: 
Auditorium 13, Domus Medica

Wednesday Lunch: Anders Ueland Waldeland

Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Anders Ueland Waldeland, Research Scientist at the Norwegian Computing Center

Title: Deep Learning for Seismic Interpretation

Abstract: Manual interpretation of salt bodies in 3D seismic datasets are important but highly time-consuming. We will see that a simple convolutional network can be used to semi-automate the interpretation and try to gain intuition about why it works.

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Ullevål Stadion, Sognsveien 77B

Wednesday Lunch: Dirck Hesse

Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Dirk Hesse, Chief Data Scientist, AIA Science.

Title:  A fool with a tool is still a fool: Real world machine learning.

Abstract: Industry applications of machine learning often face a number of technical challenges concerning scale, integration, and productionalization. Processing terabytes of customer data on a daily basis raises issues of not sufficiently discussed in academic settings. We will give an overview over these challenges and introduce tools and procedures to mitigate them.

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Spiseriet, Norwegian Computing Center

THURSDAY Biostatistical Seminar: Morten Valberg

Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 14:30

Speaker: Morten Valberg, Researcher/Postdoc, Oslo Center for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital

Title: Inequality in genetic cancer risk suggests bad genes rather than bad luck

Abstract: Heritability is often estimated by decomposing the variance of a trait into genetic and other factors. Interpreting such variance decompositions, however, is not straightforward. In particular, there is an ongoing debate on the importance of genetic factors in cancer development,   even   though   heritability   estimates   exist.   Here   we   show   that   heritability estimates contain information on the distribution of absolute risk due to genetic differences. The approach relies on the assumptions underlying the conventional heritability of liability model. We also suggest a model unrelated to heritability estimates. By applying these strategies, we describe the distribution of absolute genetic risk for 15 common cancers. We highlight the considerable inequality in genetic risk of cancer using different metrics, e.g., the Gini Index and quantile ratios which are frequently used in economics. For all these cancers, the estimated inequality in genetic risk is larger than the inequality in income in the USA.

See also paper available at http://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-01284-y

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO and Big Insight

Location: 
Domus Medica, room 2180 (outside the Department of Nutrition, second floor of DM)

BigInsight Day 2017: October 31

Tuesday, October 31, 2017 - 09:00

The yearly 2017 meeting of all researchers and partners of BigInsight will be on Tuesday 31 October from 09:00-15:30. Registration and breakfast will be from 08:30. Lunch will be served.

While we announce our yearly workshop openly, participation is restricted only to all staff from all the BigInsight partners including UiO.

PROGRAMME

Registration is now closed. Contact unni.raste@nr.no if you have any questions.

Location: 
Oslo headquarter of Skatteetaten, Fredrik Selmers vei 4, Helsfyr

Sven Furberg Seminar in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Thursday, October 19, 2017 - 14:30

Speaker: Dr. Eivind Valen, Group Leader at the Computational Biology Unit of the University of Bergen

Title: Searching for function in the dark matter of the genome

If you want to meet Dr. Eivind Valen, please book a time slot at https://doodle.com/poll/xnsb4gpse2kskcbn and send an email toanthony.mathelier@ncmm.uio.no. More information below and at http://www.mn.uio.no/ifi/english/research/networks/clsi/seminars/dr.-eivind-valen-lecture.html

Abstract: While most of the genome is transcribed, only a fraction codes for proteins. The remaining non-coding transcripts are largely uncharacterized and have been poetically referred to as “the dark matter of the genome”. We have found that many of these are highly regulated, but the lack of obvious conservation raises the question whether mere regulation is indeed indicative of function. Probing active translation we discovered that several of these actually harbor short "micropeptides" and that translation is considerably more pervasive than previously thought. Gene annotation has been biased against short peptides and an unbiased view could expand the catalog of genes. However, existence does not equal function and this “dark matter of the proteome” has yet to prove its significance.

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO, Big Insight and the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Location: 
Kristen Nygaards hus: Lille auditorium, Oslo

Wednesday Lunch: Robert Jensen, University of Tromsø

Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Robert Jensen, head of the UiT Machine Learning Group

Title: Deep Learning Research at the UiT Machine Learning Group

Abstract: This talk will present recent deep learning research at the UiT Machine Learning Group: http://site.uit.no/ml. The talk will focus on applied and industrial areas of work, as well as our flagship strategic project on deep learning for health. Finally, some directions of foundational basic research will be briefly discussed.

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Ullevål Stadion, Sognsveien 77B

THURSDAY Biostatistical Seminar: The Tien Mai

Thursday, October 5, 2017 - 14:30

Speaker: The Tien Mai, Postdoc, Oslo Center for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo

Title: Bayesian Low-rank Matrix Completion

Abstract: Matrix completion has gained a significant interest over the past 10 years (starting by the Netflix challenge 2006). It aims at reconstructing an unknown matrix from a small subset of its (noisy) entries.  In this talk, we review some state-of-the-art approaches for matrix completion, especially on Bayesian methods. Statistical warranty for Bayesian methods is discussed together with some toy numerical experiments. We further discuss the Bi-Linear matrix completion with some open windows.

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO and Big Insight

Location: 
Domus Medica, room 2180 (outside the Department of Nutrition, second floor of DM)

THURSDAY Biostatistical Seminar: Dr. Christopher Yau

Thursday, September 21, 2017 - 14:30

Dr. Christopher Yau, Reader in Computational Biology based in the Centre for Computational Biology at the University of Birmingham will present the lecture "Probabilistic modelling approach for pseudotime estimation in single cells and populations."

Note: This biostatistics seminar is jointly organised with the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics.

Meeting Dr. Yau
If you want to meet Dr. Christopher Yau, please book a time slot at https://doodle.com/poll/wkxkwqb6gzqvde5v and send an email to anthony.mathelier@ncmm.uio.no.

More information below and at http://www.mn.uio.no/ifi/english/research/networks/clsi/seminars/dr.-christopher-yau-lecture%281%29.html.

Abstract
Single cell pseudotime algorithms attempt to extract temporal information from cross-sectional molecular profiles of single cells. Whilst there are a plethora of algorithmic methods for single cell pseudotime estimation, our focus has been on the development of model-based probabilistic approaches using Bayesian  inference. I shall talk about a suite of pseudotime methods that have been developed in my group and their application to single cell genomics and beyond.

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO, Big Insight and the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Location: 
Runde Auditorium, Domus Medica, Oslo

Wednesday Lunch: Epigram / Gjensidige

Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Esten Leonardsen, Epigram

Title: Solving real life problems using AI: Price estimation of car damages

Abstract: Assessment of car damages has traditionally been a manual process. We will talk about how Gjensidige and Epigram is using image recognition to automate parts of the process, some of the problems we have faced and the techniques we have used to solve them.

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Spiseriet, Norwegian Computing Center

Wednesday Lunch: Election forecasts: why they are difficult and maybe useful

Wednesday, September 6, 2017 - 12:00

Speaker: Anders Løland, Assistant Research Director, Norwegian Computing Center.

Abstract: After Nate Silver's initial success in the presidential elections in 2008 and 2012, many forecasters failed completely in 2016. Why did this happen? We at 169.no are trying to forecast this year's Norwegian parliamentary election, and will describe and discuss in somewhat broad terms how and possibly why our model works. 

The lunch starts at 12:00, and the talk will start around 12:20.

NB: Wednesday BigInsight Lunches are open to staff and students from any of the BigInsight partners, including UiO, but not to others.

Location: 
Ullevål Stadion, Sognsveien 77B

The Hon. Doc. Sylvia Richardson Workshop 2017 on Statistics for the Life Sciences

Thursday, August 31, 2017 - 11:00

In the occasion of Professor Sylvia Richardson, University of Cambridge, receiving a Honorary Doctorate from the University of Oslo, we arrange a workshop in her honour. Please join us in the celebration of Sylvia and the statistics community at the University of Oslo, with presentations of some of the on going statistical research in the life sciences at our university:

The Hon. Doc. Sylvia Richardson Workshop 2017 on Statistics for the Life Sciences 

When: Thursday August 31st 2017, from 11.00-15.45
Where: Runde Auditorium, Domus Medica, UiO

The full program is now available here:
http://www.mn.uio.no/math/english/research/groups/statistics-biostatistics/events/hon-doc-richardson/index.html

Program:

11.00-11.10 Welcome
11.10-11.50 Manuela Zucknick 
11.50-12.30 Geir Storvik 
12.30-13.10 Lunch
13.10-13.50 Riccardo De Bin
13.50-14.30 Nils Lid Hjort
14.30-14.45 Coffee Break
14.45-15.45 Seven young statisticians 

No registration necessary. Please also attend the Honorary Doctorate talks on Friday September 1st, see separate event.

Welcome from org. comm. Riccardo De Bin, Arnoldo Frigessi and Ingrid Glad

Location: 
Runde Auditorium, Domus Medica, UiO

THURSDAY Biostatistical Seminar: Roderic Guigò

Thursday, June 22, 2017 - 14:30

Speaker: Roderic Guigò, Professor, Centre de Regualció Genòmica, Barcelona, Spain

Title: The molecular anatomy of the human body

Note: This biostatistics seminar is jointly organised with the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics. At the end of the seminar simple food and refreshments will be served.

If you want to meet Dr. Roderic Guigó, please book a time slot at https://doodle.com/poll/wattnfraexmrbexy and send an email to anthony.mathelier@ncmm.uio.no with your contact information. More information below and at http://www.mn.uio.no/ifi/english/research/networks/clsi/seminars/dr.-roderic-guig%C3%B3-lecture.html

Abstract: The pilot phase of the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project has produced RNASeq from 1,641 samples originated from up to 43 tissues from 175 post-mortem donors, and constitutes a unique resource to investigate the human transcriptome across tissues and individuals. Clustering of samples based on gene expression recapitulates tissue types, separating solid from not solid tissues, while clustering based on splicing separates neural from non-neural tissues, suggesting that post-transcriptional regulation plays a comparatively important role in the definition of neural tissues .About 47 % of the variation in gene expression can be explained by variation of across tissues, while only 4% by variation across individuals. We find that the relative contribution of individual variation is similar for lncRNAs and for protein coding genes. However, we find that genes that vary with ethnicity are enriched in lncRNAs, whereas genes that vary with age are mostly protein coding. Among genes that vary with gender, we find novel candidates both to participate and to escape X-inactivation. In addition, by merging information on GWAS we are able to identify specific candidate genes that may explain differences in susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases between males and females and different ethnic groups. We find that genes that decrease with age are involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer and identify novel candidates that could be involved in these diseases. In contrast to gene expression, splicing varies similarly among tissues and individuals, and exhibits a larger proportion of residual unexplained variance. This may reflect that that stochastic, non-functional fluctuations of the relative abundances of splice isoforms may be more common than random fluctuations of gene expression. By comparing the variation of the abundance of individual isoforms across all GTEx samples, we find that a large fraction of this variation between tissues (84%) can be simply explained by variation in bulk gene expression, with splicing variation contributing comparatively little. This strongly suggests that regulation at the primary transcription level is the main driver of tissue specificity. Although blood is the most transcriptionally distinct of the surveyed tissues, RNA levels monitored in blood may retain clinically relevant information that can be used to help assess medical or biological conditions.

Organizer: Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE), Research group in Statistics and Biostatistics, Dept. of Mathematics, UiO, Big Insight and the Sven Furberg Seminars in Bioinformatics and Statistical Genomics

Location: 
Hagen 3, Forskningsparken, Oslo